Monday, June 20, 2016

My last few days in Honduras

I am home! I got home Thursday night.
It is great being back on American soil again, and wonderful being back home.

I wasn't able to blog much my last few days because the wifi was in and out a lot. So I decided to wait until I get back home to recap my last few days there.

Sunday evening a mission team came in to spend the week. They were also from KY, and we knew some of the same people- small world!
 It was a group of 8 women, and 1 man. This group was absolute life to me. They welcomed me into their group, loved me, always wanted me to hang out with them, and said I was now an honorary member. :)
 I have no doubt that God brought them to me, just when I needed them most. I love these ladies and they will always have a special place in my heart.


Monday we went to 3 different places. First we went to a special needs girls home. I'm guessing there were maybe 50 girls there, their needs were all different.
 It was wonderful getting to love on them, give them hugs, braid their hair, play ball with them, etc. It seems like every place I went, there was always just one girl I really connected with.
 At the girls home, this one particular girl gave me the longest hug as I was saying goodbye. It felt like she didn't want to let me go. It was so, so hard to break away.


Singing with the girls

This girl is 12 years old, and blind. Sweetheart.

Then we went to a men's rehab center, and then to Los Bordos, the slums of Honduras, in San Pedro Sula. (Oh, how awful to say you live in the slums.)

A very expensive high rise behind the slums
There was a precious little girl there that I really connected with, named Jolena. She was probably around 10, not real sure. I wanted to take her home with me more than any baby. I adored her. She just laughed and laughed at the Snapchat filters. Hearing her laugh made my day.



On my last day there we went shopping. That was fun, and a very interesting experience. Again, it's just amazing how different our cultures are.




These are the 2 Honduran girls who work in the home. We weren't able to go out after all, so that was disappointing. But I just loved them to pieces. Before I left I gave one of them a little bit of money (the other girl wasn't there, so I left some for her too), she just started crying, and was so thankful. A little bit of money to us, is a whole lot to them.

Thursday I said my goodbye's and headed to the airport.
You'll never guess what happened as I was sitting there, waiting on the plane.
Yep, the electricity went out. No lights, no computers, nothing. I laughed out loud. Seriously. What a perfect ending to my trip! Haha!

Goodbye, Honduras!


One thing I realized during my time in Honduras: I absolutely, 100% want to foster a child.
 I'd always said I couldn't foster because it would be too hard to give the child back, I just couldn't do it.
 But seeing the impact R & E are having on their 4 babies, seeing how those babies lives are changed forever because this couple wanted to make a difference; makes me want to do the same.
 Seeing how A and her husband rescued their 3 kids from the streets, and now they have love that they never would've known, makes me want to do the same.
 I would love to foster to adopt, but no matter the time I would get with them, I know I could make a difference in his or her life. My eyes were opened.

 Thank you all for your kind words, and your encouragement through the tough times, these past 2.5 weeks. I love y'all!!

10 comments:

  1. I bet that little girl wanted you to take her with you as bad as you wanted to take her :(

    Yep - electricity going out - just seems appropriate :)

    I love that God worked on your heart to open you up to fostering. I think you'd be amazing at it. You have so much love to give to babies/kids that need a home ... & it will be hard to give them up - but you know they are going to go to good homes & you were a part of their lives for a purpose.

    Welcome home!

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  2. The little girl named Jolena is beautiful! Such a pretty smile. I can see why you'd want to bring her back with you. And the little baby in the diaper is heartbreaking! Are he and his mother standing in front of what they live in? Behind the rock?

    I bet the day of shopping was a very nice change for you. Did you buy anything interesting? Welcome back!

    April in Georgia

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  3. What a wonderfully filled last few days -- I haven't been on a mission trip in far too long ... but I remember the first few days being like an orientation period, then the actual work, and the last few days it's rush-rush-rush to get in the sightseeing and souvenir-shopping and saying goodbye to everyone so that the trip home is very introspective. AND you didn't have the distraction of electricity, amiright? :) Seriously though, seeing the slums and the high-rise in the background was very sad. It's definitely a case of the haves vs. the have-nots, isn't it? Housing, education, etc. -- does the country do anything to help the poor get a step up? Not handouts, but grants or something to help them break the poverty cycle within their family if they are determined to have a better life? Then again, does our country do enough for the poor within our borders or do we just provide bandaids and the poverty cycle continues to the next generation? Gah ... I didn't even go on your trip and it's made me think! :)

    Welcome back to the USA! Did you have culture shock returning?

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  4. It looks like this was an enriching life experience that can open doors to what you thought may have been closed. God Bless! ~Gabrielle

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